[SE08-DRR] Early Warning Systems: Design and Implementation

DAY 2 – Tuesday 3 May – 11:15-12:45
Swiss Tech | Room 3C | Level Garden

Session Leaders | Summary | Panelists and Abstracts

 

Session Leaders

Holger Frey
University of Zurich, Switzerland

Holger Frey is a Research Associate University of Zurich, PhD in glaciers and glacier lake mapping and analyses with GIS and remote sensing. Working experience in research and cooperation projects on climate impact in Peru and India; expertise in glacier hazards and risks.

     

Christian Huggel
University of Zurich, Switzerland

Christian Huggel is a Senior Researcher and Group Leader at University of Zurich; long-standing track record of research and projects in climate change impacts, risks and adaptation with a focus on mountains in several regions worldwide. Lead-author of IPCC AR5 WGII.

   

Summary

Early Warning Systems (EWS) have become more and more important for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in recent years, and this trend is expected to continue in the future. EWS aim at predicting or detecting hazardous processes by collecting and analyzing data and providing information for decision making to responsible authorities. A successful implementation requires not only detailed process understanding and adequate sensor and communication infrastructure, but also close collaboration and communication between all involved actors, including authorities and the population. This necessitates geoscientific expertise and modeling skills, knowledge of juristic and institutional rules and regulations, and awareness of the local knowledge and risk perception. EWS are thus highly complex systems that involve scientific, technical, institutional, and social aspects.

In this session different aspects addressing the key elements of EWS will be presented: Improvement of the understanding of involved physical processes, design and implementation of sensor systems and data management, analyses of data needs and availability for decision making, information and communication issues between the different actors, as well as improvements of the response to disasters. Besides specific contributions to one of the issues described above, several examples of integrative EWS implementations will be presented. By sharing experiences from different regions in South Asia, the Caucasus, and Latin America, we expect to get an overview of both general and region-specific challenges and their potential solution. By summarizing the lessons learnt from the different EWS aspects and applications we finally aim at outlining some good practices for future EWS implementations.

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Juan Ballesteros-Cánovas, University of Geneva & Dendrolab.ch, Switzerland, Flash Flood Reconstruction in Kullu District (Himachal Pradesh): Implication in Flood Disaster Risk Management [PDF Full Paper]

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Javier Fluixá-Sanmartín, Centre de Recherche sur l’Environnement Alpin, Switzerland, Highlights and Lessons from the Implementation of an Early Warning System for Glacier Lake Outburst Floods in Carhuaz, Peru [PDF Full Paper]

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Yeeshu Shukla, Christian Aid, India, Enhancing Frontline Resilience: Trans- Border Community Based Flood Early Warning System in India and Nepal [PDF Full Paper]

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Daniel Tobler, GEOTEST AG, Switzerland, Early Warning Systems for Glacier Lake Outburst Floods and Debris Flows – Case Studies from China and Georgia [PDF Full Paper]

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Marc van den Homberg, Cordaid, The Netherlands, Bridging the Information Gap: Mapping Data Sets on Information Needs in the Preparedness and Response Phase

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